Wednesday, February 5, 2020

Napoleon Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

Napoleon - Essay Example For example, in military affairs, he managed military inventions, which were necessary for the French revolution. This included the use of mass conscription enabling the use of block tactics to enhance attacks in columns. This also helped in the elimination of supply lines enabling the French armies to be mobile (Lyons, 25). History depicts that, before the reign of napoleon, France had undergone revolutionary turmoil for over a decade. Causing instability in the government and increasing incidents of corruption. It is evident that during this period church policies were rare because they triggered inflation. The citizens of France were tired of the situation, and they desired for a stable government that would ensure the stability of their lives. These changes were brought about by napoleons reign because it is his military innovations that helped the French in to secure their government. The success of the military forces established by napoleon helped him to consolidate and hold o n to power. This led to his declaration as the French emperor in the year 1804 (Lyons, 33). Politically it is evident that Napoleon was an active administrator. History depicts that the internal reforms that were put in place by Napoleon helped France in consolidating some achievements during the French revolution, enhancing the suppression of others. ... The political impact during his reign in France is also depicted from his introduction of equality as one of the essential factors in politics. This is because he thought that by introducing the concept, he would have stayed in his position with little threat. This changed the political situation in France because all men were considered equal under his power. Some of his main accomplishments in ensuring equality in the political system are evident from the establishment of Napoleonic civil codes. This made all the men equal, however; the law despised the women because the men maintained their legal powers over the women. This had an impact on the political structure of France because the hopes that the women had towards the revolution as an improvement of their legal positions were frustrated by Napoleon (Lyons, 55). Napoleon is also seen to have made a contribution to the political structure of the French government through his introduction of nationalism. History depicts that he i s one of the French leaders, who believed in nationalism as a tool that would help him obtain the loyalty of the French people during his reign. It is evident that it is this spirit of nationalism that enhanced the inspiration of the armies of the French government enabling the government to attain a remarkable series of victories. These were of enormous benefit to him as he obtained a chance to rise to power. However, this interfered with the political structure of France as it was thought to be a trick that was used, by the leader, to establish a personality cult making the French people identify him with France. This meant that by the citizens being loyal to their country France they were also being loyal to him. It is evident that

Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Literature Review: Organizational Development

Literature Review: Organizational Development The topic under consideration is organizational development, knowledge creation and change management. The main focus of this research is to see how the process of change management is affected by organizational development and knowledge creation. In order to get an overall view of that these broad areas are their relationship with each other, a literature review was conducted. Worren Ruddle Moore (1999) explored about how over the years people have moved from organizational development to a more holistic view which is change management. According to this article the tools used in change management and organizational development are the same but the rationale behind it is different. For example attitude surveys are used in both. In organizational development it was used to gauge job satisfaction and the climate of the organization but in change management it is part of a strategy driven and holistic change program. This article basically uses research of various other people to give us a complete picture of what change management is all about. According to them as now the scale of businesses is increasing and so is the need for having specialized firms to administer change. They talked about interventionist and integrative strategies. Interventionist strategies are used in organizational development where as integrative strategies are used in change manag ement. The variables taken from this article are change management and organizational development. These variables are very important for the research as it clearly defines what the word change management would mean when it would be used in the research. The definition also takes both the culture and structure aspect of change management into account. The authors concluded that in order to increase the standard and the overall performance of the organization the company as to use the integrative strategies because when the employees are a part of the whole process the resistance to change is minimized. Van de Ven Poole (1995) through their research gave a theoretical overview of how development and change management basically occurs. The article classifies four types development theories namely; life- cycle theory, teleological theory, dialectical theory and evolutionary theory. The authors were of the opinion that these basic theories can be used to explain how change occurs in the organization. To explain that they developed a framework with these four theories and classified companies based on the mode and unit of change at various levels of organizational development. The conclusion they drew from their research was that as the organization grew in size the motors of change also get more complex because comes into play at once. Ikujiro Nonaka(1994) gives a comprehensive view of how knowledge is created within the organizations. The main variable identified for knowledge creation is innovation. It is defined as follows Innovation is a process in which the organization creates and defines problems and then actively develops new knowledge to solve them The article also identifies three dimensions of knowledge creation. This includes epistemology, ontological and the spiral model of knowledge. The paper differentiates between codified, formal (explicit) and informal, personal information. He concluded that the organization played a very important role as far as knowledge is concerned. The organization can facilitate the creation of knowledge by encouraging socialization, internalization of codified information into tacit information etc. Choi Lee (2002) stated that knowledge creation is very important to insure a persistent positive financial growth. The authors basically classify the knowledge creation management strategies into either human or system oriented. They used empirical data to prove the link between the mode of knowledge creation and its management strategies. The authors concluded that proper grouping of the mode of knowledge being used and the strategies involved is essential to achieve the desired financial improvement. For example it the mode of knowledge creation is socialization it should be aligned with the human strategy in order for it to be effective. It also found out knowledge creation strategies different with different types of departments that are taken into account. This research also gives us guidelines for future research which includes a comparative analysis between the service and the manufacturing sector. This study basically shows how qualitative variables can be measured quantitat ively. I will be using the study as a guide when formulating the survey form etc. Bloodgood Salisbury (2001) talks about that organizations can implement change and gain and maintain a completive advantage but this cannot be achieved by knowledge creation alone. Knowledge transfer and knowledge protection is equally important. The authors have used the Resource-Based View (RBV) to explain how both types of information i.e. explicit and tacit can help in the change process and how they can be transferred to achieve long-term benefit. In the paper they identified knowledge creation as a process which is based on creativity and a shared knowledge between a group of people which can be used to make new products as well as management strategies. The authors went on to stress that it is not just creating knowledge. It would be of no use if other can get that information from your company easily or it can be altered. So the protection of the knowledge is equally important for a business to remain competitive. To ensure its safety security and legal measure should be use d. Rune Todnems (2005) paper basically talks about things which should be taken care off when conducting research in the field of change management. This article basically takes into account various researches conducted in this field and then draws consensus based on the data they have. The two main findings of this paper were as follows: Firstly, it is agreed that the pace of change has never been greater than in the current business environment (Balogun and Hope Hailey, 2004; Burnes, 2004; Carnall, 2003; Kotter, 1996; Luecke, 2003; Moran and Brightman, 2001; Okumus and Hemmington, 1998; Paton and McCalman, 2000; Senior, 2002). Secondly, there is a consensus that change, being triggered by internal or external factors, comes in all shapes, forms and sizes (Balogun and Hope Hailey, 2004; Burnes, 2004; Carnall, 2003; Kotter, 1996; Luecke, 2003), and, therefore, affects all organizations in all industries. Waddell Sohal (1998) stated that resistance is as a critically important factor that can influence the success of change management. They defined it as: Resistance, in an organizational setting, is an expression of reservation which normally arises as a response or reaction to change (Block 1989) The authors throughout the paper talked about resistance. They were of the opinion that resistance to change should not be seen as a hurdle is had its own advantages. They used a lot secondary data to put their point across. Though their research they were able to conclude that resistance from the management can actually lead to greater stability in the external environment. This conflict between the internal and the external environment which is brought about by change is actually healthy for the business as a whole. The authors also identified that resistance at time draws attention to certain aspects of change which might not be appropriate for the organization in the long run. The most important advantage concluded by them was that it results in an influx of energy within the organization which is healthy for the organization as it in turn results in higher levels of efficiency. Keller Aiken (2009) talks about some stereotypes which are prevalent about change management. They based their research on John Kotter research which was published in 1995. They basically identified some of the mistake which managers in all the organizations make then they are administrating change in the organization. The concluded that what motivate you as a person might not motivate most of the employees in the organization. So special attention should be given to the things that motivate the employees. Secondly they identified that the leaders/ managers who are bringing about the change should not believe that they are the change and just because the manager/ leader is influential you cannot guarantee effective change within the organization. They also went on to point out that good intentions of the managers are not enough to ensure that the change management will be effective. Employees all need some kind of monetary reward to ensure maximum compliance. Ash (2009) in his article basically talks about how change can be managed efficiently. He talks about the time lag between the decision is made and implemented and the results in the form of increased performance to be seen. According to him this is due to more resistance than expected by the top management from the side on the employees. He goes on to explain why organizations generally fail to minimize the negative consequences of transition. According to him most organizations do little to allay such fears and concerns which results in slow change process. People initially resist change is the uncertainty change creates. Theoretical Framework C:Documents and SettingsuserLocal SettingsTemporary Internet FilesContent.Worduntitled.bmp Hypothesis H0= organization size will have an effect on change management? H1= organization size will not have an effect on change management? H0= internal stability would have a positive effect on change management? H1= internal stability would have no or a negative effect on change management? H0= business performance will have an effect on change management? H1= business performance will not have an effect on change management? H0= knowledge creation has a positive impact on change management? H1= knowledge creation has a negative impact on change management? H0= innovation results in knowledge creation? H1= innovation does not result in knowledge creation? H0= knowledge transfer has an effect on knowledge creation? H1= knowledge transfer does not have an effect on knowledge creation? Systolic Architecture: History and Applications Systolic Architecture: History and Applications SYSTOLIC ARCHITECTURE A network of PEs that rhythmically produce and pass data through the system is called systolic architecture. It is used as a co processor in combination with a host computer and the behavior is analogous to the flow of blood through heart; thus named SYSTOLIC.  · A systolic architecture has the following characteristics : A massive and non-centralised parallelism Local communications Synchronous evaluation  · Example of systolic network 1. Linear network 2. Bi-dimensional network 3. Hexagonal network HISTORY:- The systolic architecture paradigm, data-stream-driven by data counters, is the counterpart of thevon Neumann paradigm, instruction-stream-driven by a program counter. Because a systolic architecture usually sends and receives multiple data streams, and multiple data counters are needed to generate these data streams, it supportsdata parallelism.The namederives from analogy with the regular pumping of blood by the heart. H. T. KungandCharles E. Leierson published the first paper describing systolic arrays in 1978; however, the first machine known to have used a similar technique was theColossus Mark IIin 1944. NEED FOR SYSTOLIC ARCHITECHTURE:- We need a high-performance, special-purpose computer system to meet specific application. I/O and computation imbalance is a notable problem .The concept of Systolic architecture can map high-level computation into hardware structures .Systolic system is easy to implement because of its regularity and easy to recon .Systolic architecture can result in cost-effective , high- performance special-purpose systems for a wide range of problems. An efficient approach to design very large scale integration (VLSI) architectures and a scheme for the implementation of the discrete sine transform (DST), based on an appropriate decomposition method that uses circular correlations, is presented. The proposed design uses an efficient restructuring of the computation of the DST into two circular correlations, having similar structures and only one half of the length of the original transform; these can be concurrently computed and mapped on to the same systolic array. Significant improvement in the computational speed can be obtained at a reduced input-output (I/O) cost and low hardware complexity, retaining all the other benefits of the VLSI implementations of the discrete transforms, which use circular correlation or cyclic convolution structures. These features are demonstrated by comparing the proposed design with some of the previously reported schemes. A more computationally efficient and scalable systolic architecture is provided for computing the discrete Fourier transform. The systolic architecture also provides a method for reducing the array area by limiting the number of complex multi pliers. In one embodiment, the design improvement is achieved by taking advantage of a more efficient computation scheme based on symmetries in the Fourier transform coefficient matrix and the radix-4 butterfly. The resulting design provides an array comprised of a plurality of smaller base-4 matrices that can simply be added or removed to provide scalability of the design for applications involving different transform lengths to be calculated. In this embodiment, the systolic array size provides greater flexibility because it can be applied for use with any transform length which is an integer multiple of sixteen. A systolic network is often use with a host station responsible for the communication with the outside world.As a result of the loca l-communication scheme, a systolic network is easily extended without to add any burden to the I/O. CHARACHTERSTICS OF SYSTOLIC ARCHITECHTURE:- A massive and non-centralised parallelism Local communications Synchronous evaluation Data coming from the memory are used several time before to come back to it. These architectures are well suited for a VLSI or FPGA network implementation.  · Other characteristics : A systolic network is often use with a host station responsible for the communication with the outside world. As a result of the local-communication scheme, a systolic network is easily extended without to add any burden to the I/O. PRINCIPLE OF SYSTOLIC ARCHITECHTURE:- Systolic system consists of a set interconnected cells, each capable of performing some simple operation. Systolic approach can speed up a compute-bound computation in a relatively simple and inexpensive manner. Through systolic array we achieve higher computation throughput without increasing memory bandwidth. Which means that by using systolic architechture we can speed up our system. For eg. When we are using our simple aechitecture than we can perform atmost five million operatoins per second whereas by using systolic arrays in systolic architecture we can operate the system at a speed of 30 million operations per second. WORKING:- Systolic architecture consists of simple cells arranged in some regular pattern (linear, bi-directional, triangular, hexagonal, etc.) where each cell usually performs one operation. Each processing cell is connected to its neighbour or to a neighbour hood of processing elements by short signal paths. Both parallel and pipelined execution is implemented. A function that is to be performed can be represented by a set of Functional Primitives. The systolic structure has advantages of regularity and modularity over implementations of the block-state-variable form, as it is regular and an nth order filter is simply formed by cascading second order filters. Therefore it is more suitable for the VLSI implementation. The idea is to exploit VLSI efficiently by laying out algorithms (and hence architectures) in 2-D (not all systolic machines are 2-D, but most are). The architectures thus produced are not general but tied to specific algorithms. This is good for computation-intensive tasks (e.g. signal processing). TOOLS FOR SYSTOLIC ARCHITECTURE:- SYSTOLIC ARRAY:- Incomputer architecture, asystolic arrayis a pipe network arrangement of processing units called cells. It is a specialized form ofparallel computing, where cells (i.e. processors), compute data and store it independently of each other. We need a high-performance, special-purpose computer system to meet specific application. I/O and computation imbalance is a notable problem. The concept of Systolic architecture can map high-level computation into hardware structures. Systolic system works like an automobile assembly line. Systolic system is easy to implement because of its regularity and easy to recon. Systolic architecture can result in cost-effective, high-performance special-purpose systems for a wide range of problem. Systolic Array Example: 33 Systolic Array Matrix Multiplication:- T=7 DESCRIPTION OF SYSTOLIC ARRAYS:-  · Description : It is a network of interconnected processing units. Only the processors at the border of the architecture can communicate outside. The task of one cell can be summarised as : receive-compute-transmit A systolic array is composed of matrix-like rows of data processing units called cells. Data processing unitsDPUsare similar tocentral processing units(CPU)s,(except for aprogram counter, since operation istransport-triggered, i.e., by the arrival of a data object). Each cell shares the information with its neighbors immediately after processing. The systolic array is often rectangular where data flows across the array between neighbour DPUs, often with different data flowing in different directions. The data streams entering and leaving the ports of the array are generated byauto-sequencing memoryunits, ASMs. Each ASM includes adata counter. Inembedded systemsa data stream may also be input from and/or output to an external source. An example of a systolicalgorithmmight be designed formatrix multiplication. Onematrixis fed in a row at a time from the top of the array and is passed down the array, the other matrix is fed in a column at a time from the left hand side of the array and passes from left to right. Dummy values are then passed in until each processor has seen one whole row and one whole column. At this point, the result of the multiplication is stored in the array and can now be output a row or a column at a time, flowing down or across the array. Systolic arrays are arrays of DPUs which are connected to a small number of nearest neighbour DPUs in a mesh-like topology. DPUs perform a sequence of operations on data that flows between them. Because the traditional systolic array synthesis methods have been practiced by algebraic algorithms, only uniform arrays with only linear pipes can be obtained, so that the architectures are the same in all DPUs. The consequence is that only applications with regular data dependencies can be implemented on classical systolic arrays. LikeSIMDmachines, clocked systolic arrays compute in lock-step with each processor undertaking alternate compute | communicate phases. But systolic arrays with asynchronous handshake between DPUs are calledwave front arrays. One well-known systolic array is CMUs I Warp processor, which has been manufactured by Intel. An I Warp system has a linear array processor connected by data buses going in both directions.  · Super Systolic Array : The super systolic array is a generalization of the systolic array. Because the classical synthesis methods (algebraic, i. e. projection-based synthesis), yielding only uniformDPUarrays permitting only linear pipes, systolic arrays could be used only to implement applications with regular data dependencies. By using simulated annealinginstead,Rainer Kresshas introduced the generalized systolic array: the super systolic array. Its application is not restricted to applications with regular data dependencies. Applications:- An application Example Polynomial Evaluation Horners rule for evaluating a polynomial is: y= ((((an*x+an− 1) *x+an− 2) *x+an− 3) *x+ +a1) *x+a0 A linear systolic array in which the processors are arranged in pairs: one multiplies its input byxand passes the result to the right, the next addsajand passes the result to the right. Advantages and Disadvantages:- ADVANTAGES Faster Scalable DISADVANTAGES Expensive Highly specialized for particular applications Difficult to build More about systolic architectures :- Systolic architectures are designed by using linear mapping techniques on regular dependence graphs (DG). Regular Dependence Graph : The presence of an edge in a certain direction at any node in the DG represents presence of an edge in the same direction at all nodes in the DG. DG corresponds to space representation no time instance is assigned to any computation t=0. †¢ Systolic architectures have a space-time representation where each node is mapped to a certain processing element(PE) and is scheduled at a particular time instance. Systolic design methodology maps an N-dimensional DG to a lower dimensional systolic architecture. Mapping of N-dimensional DG to (N-1) dimensional o systolic array is considered. CONCLUSION: A massively parallel processing with limited input output communication with host computer. Suitable for many interactive operations. Replace single processor with an array of regular processing elements Orchestrate data flow for high throughput with less memory access a. Different from pipelining Nonlinear array structure, multidirection data flow, each PE may have (small) local instruction and data memory Different from SIMD: each PE may do something different Initial motivation: VLSI enables inexpensive special-purpose chips Represent algorithms directly by chips connected in regular pattern BIBLIOGRAPHY:- * Text Book * http://www-old.oberon.ethz.ch/WirthPubl/AD.pdf * http://www.google.co.in/search?q=description+of+systolic+architecturehl=enrlz=1C1GGLS_enIN323IN323start=20sa=N  · http://www.cs.nctu.edu.tw/~ldvan/teaching/vlsidsp/VLSIDSP_CHAP7.pdf  · http://www.google.co.in/search?hl=enrlz=1C1GGLS_enIN323IN323q=%2Bworking+of+systolic+architectureei=lFzzSYDQO8zelQeRqaTDDAsa=Xoi=stemming_tipct=title  · http://eprints.iisc.ernet.in/6808/  · www.wikipedia.org  · http://www.google.co.in/search?rlz=1C1GGLS_enIN323IN323sourceid=chromeie=UTF-8q=description+of+systolic+architecture

Sunday, January 19, 2020

Euthanasia: We Have a Right to a Peaceful Death :: Euthanasia, Physician Assisted Suicide

If there is a contemporary ethical issue which is even more explosive than abortion, it's the question of whether human beings have the right to a peaceful death (euthanasia). In my opinion, a terminally ill person should have a right to avoid pre-death pains and die as peacefully as possible. At this final stage of our presence here, we should not agonize in pointless pain but try to leave well and this implies our right to decide whether we should use euthanasia. Thus, I believe that we need a law that will confirm our rights to euthanasia. However this issue goes beyond merely a right of a certain individual for euthanasia. Many legal norms and procedures must be developed and conventional moral norms must be modified in order to accommodate euthanasia in practice in the USA. In cases of active assisted euthanasia, an assistant (doctor) should feel himself or herself morally comfortable, i.e. not viewed as a murderer. In cases of active unassisted euthanasia a dying person should not be judged as a person who committed suicide. As to the procedures that the government must develop they should ensure that there is a minimum chance of abuse of euthanasia. (Sasha, your part) Abuse aside, it is important that euthanasia does not become simply an expedient solution to the problem of the care for elderly. Nowadays in the United States, even a somewhat healthy elderly person after a certain age comes under a growing social pressure to enter a nursing home, so as to solve the problem of his or her care. Similar pressure (even if to a different degree) to exercise one’s right to euthanasia will necessarily exist if it is legalized. Thus, society must be extremely careful not to let euthanasia become just another convenient solution to the problem of elderly care. It is only the last resort of a person to end agonizing pain, not to stop being a â€Å"burden† on the family or society. This will be especially important in about 10-20-30 years as a large segment of population, the baby boomers, will start approaching the end of their lives. As to the work of Dr. Euthanasia: We Have a Right to a Peaceful Death :: Euthanasia, Physician Assisted Suicide If there is a contemporary ethical issue which is even more explosive than abortion, it's the question of whether human beings have the right to a peaceful death (euthanasia). In my opinion, a terminally ill person should have a right to avoid pre-death pains and die as peacefully as possible. At this final stage of our presence here, we should not agonize in pointless pain but try to leave well and this implies our right to decide whether we should use euthanasia. Thus, I believe that we need a law that will confirm our rights to euthanasia. However this issue goes beyond merely a right of a certain individual for euthanasia. Many legal norms and procedures must be developed and conventional moral norms must be modified in order to accommodate euthanasia in practice in the USA. In cases of active assisted euthanasia, an assistant (doctor) should feel himself or herself morally comfortable, i.e. not viewed as a murderer. In cases of active unassisted euthanasia a dying person should not be judged as a person who committed suicide. As to the procedures that the government must develop they should ensure that there is a minimum chance of abuse of euthanasia. (Sasha, your part) Abuse aside, it is important that euthanasia does not become simply an expedient solution to the problem of the care for elderly. Nowadays in the United States, even a somewhat healthy elderly person after a certain age comes under a growing social pressure to enter a nursing home, so as to solve the problem of his or her care. Similar pressure (even if to a different degree) to exercise one’s right to euthanasia will necessarily exist if it is legalized. Thus, society must be extremely careful not to let euthanasia become just another convenient solution to the problem of elderly care. It is only the last resort of a person to end agonizing pain, not to stop being a â€Å"burden† on the family or society. This will be especially important in about 10-20-30 years as a large segment of population, the baby boomers, will start approaching the end of their lives. As to the work of Dr.

Saturday, January 11, 2020

Language Study Plan Essay

In the world of globalization, communication has played an important role in human life. English for example has become an international language for people to communicate with each other from different country. That is the reason that I choose English as my second language. As a child, my father persuaded me to study English because he strongly believe that studying another language in young age can have a huge result and efficient effect to me when I grow up. I have been studying English for more than 8 year and I have use English a lot in my daily life to improve this language. Sometime I feel more confident using English than my native language which is Khmer. However, the more I study the more I gain so I have been trying so hard to improve my English to advance level which is required for taking a bachelor’s degree course. Moreover, if I get admit to scholarship I will be studying preliminary Korean language course to which I believe that English will become the main lan guage for me to study Korean. As a result I will improve both in Korean and English. Korean has always been the language that I want to study the most but because I couldn’t spare my time for these in my high school, I considered to wait until university. However, in my free time in order to entertain myself from all those hardship work at school I always enjoy watching Korean drama and their variety shows that have a subtitle so I use to this language even I couldn’t understand but still I know some phrase and word in Korean. I believe that by taking a preliminary Korean language course I will improve this languages as my third languages quickly which is required for taking a bachelor’s degree course because I will be using Korean in my daily life such as studying and communicating as a result I will become confident in using Korean as I feel in using English.

Friday, January 3, 2020

Personal Statement Occupational Therapy - 866 Words

Occupational therapy is the ability to provide help to others fairly and respectfully by doing everyday activities that can actually benefit the patients by improving the quality of his or her life. By doing so, this patient will be able to return to their loved ones and their daily activities. As a future occupational therapy, I will try my best to help these patients reach their goals of becoming dependent again. The passion that I have to help those that are in needs of treatments. There are several reasons that I choose to become an occupational therapist, among those reasons are the desire I have to help those that are in need of medical treatments. To continue, I wanted a career that would not take too long to complete and not have a long waiting list. To begin, not onIy I wanted a career that would not take too long to complete but also, one where I would not have to take too long to get accepted. Becoming an occupational therapist was never a preference to me. When I was in high school my vision was focus on becoming a nurse or a physician assistant. After high school, reality strikes; however one can no longer dream of becoming the superstar, the NFL player; or being famous. As adult; or once in college, we tend to search for a long term career that will help us becoming successful in the future. Unfortunately, during my first semester in college, I concluded it would take forever to become a nurse; moreover, in order to pursue my determination of becoming aShow MoreRelatedPersonal Statement : Occupational Therapy923 Words   |  4 PagesMy fascination with technology sparked my interest in the health care field and ultimately in occupational therapy. As a computer technician I felt how gratifying it was to help people adapt t o their environment to accomplish their daily tasks. Seeing injury and exhaustion set in on my coworkers as they sat in their grey cubicles for hours, moved me to craft ergonomic workspaces, such as replacing their seats with yoga balls to improve their posture and spinal alignment, while providing others withRead MorePersonal Statement On Occupational Therapy1556 Words   |  7 Pagesof public health as defined -- why or why not? (this will likely take 1- 1  ½ pages) Occupational therapy is a profession that address the vital importance of people’s psychological and physical needs as well as emotional well-being. Occupational therapists focus on taking care of their clients through a holistic view by looking at how personal factors influence the disease process. In addition, occupation therapy practitioners are an important part in teaching and educating individuals the ways ofRead MorePersonal Statement On Occupational Therapy915 Words   |  4 Pagesand with my work and volunteer experiences. 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The occupational therapy student (OTS) will present research on the libertarian candidate Gary Johnson, and his views on healthcare and occupational therapy. About Gary Johnson and the Libertarian Party Gary Johnson is a candidate representing the libertarianRead MoreOccupational Therapy Philosophy1209 Words   |  5 Pages------------------------------------------------- Occupational Therapy: Integrating Art and Science * ------------------------------------------------- * ------------------------------------------------- What is occupational therapy? How does one define the profession and validate its worth in the medical field? Since its conception as an established health care profession, occupational therapy’s philosophy has been defined, redefined, and refined. In their writings esteemed Occupational Therapists Mary ReillyRead MoreSocial Cognitive Modeling Characteristics : Analysis1062 Words   |  5 Pagesof St. Augustine Unit #5-EDF 7171900- Motivation Theory in Education Social cognitive theory analyzes on how people gain knowledge, expertise and their interactions during the process. It also, looks at the external influences imposed by personal factors, and environmental interactions. According to social cognitive theorists (Schunk, Meece Pintrich, 2014) effective modeling happens when the observer is motivated to learn (p. 132). What triggers his/her motivation? How do we know theRead MoreThe Field Of Occupational Therapy1216 Words   |  5 Pagesfield of occupational therapy during the mechanistic paradigm of the 1960’s. In the last few years of this decade, occupational therapy was beginning to divert back to its original, holistic focus. Occupation as a health-restoring measure, with emphasis on the person and environment, was becoming the focal point (Flick, 2015). Elizabeth Yerxa, a registered occupational therapist, emerged as a leader during this time with contributions to the philosophical foundation and values of the occupationa l therapyRead MoreResearch Study, Ward, Mitchell, And Price1299 Words   |  6 Pagesrelationship to social and occupational participation (American Occupational Therapy Association, 2014). Their research redirects the profession to it’s core values and puts an emphasis on the importance to keep OT client-centered and occupation-based moving forward in our profession to ensure clients are engaging in meaningful occupations. (World Federation of Occupational Therapists, 2010). Identification of the Leader: Kristine Ward Kristine Ward MS, OTR/L is an Occupational Therapist at McKay Dee

Thursday, December 26, 2019

William Blakes The Chimney Sweeper Essay - 672 Words

William Blakes The Chimney Sweeper William Blakes The Chimney Sweeper, written in 1789, tells the story of what happened to many young boys during this time period. Often, boys as young as four and five were sold for the soul purpose of cleaning chimneys because of their small size. These children were exploited and lived a meager existence that was socially acceptable at the time. Blake voices the evils of this acceptance through point of view, symbolism, and his startling irony. Blake expresses his poem in first person, as a young chimney sweeper. This gives his poetic voice creditability because the subject of the poem is chimney sweepers. In addition, using first person creates a deeper sense of sympathy in the reader.†¦show more content†¦In this quote the â€Å"coffins of black; symbolize the chimneys (554). Ultimately this all symbolizes the boys’ death because of their terrible life cleaning chimneys at such a young age. In the next stanza an Angel comes â€Å"And he opened the coffins and set them all free,; which symbolizes the boys’ death and escape to heaven. All of these symbols cause feelings of sympathy in the reader, hopefully causing them to want to help these children escape their fate. Blake also uses startling irony in this poem. This irony shocks the reader into realization of how terrible life is for these small boys. Some of the verbal irony Blake uses lies in the first stanza. The poetic voice claims that â€Å"[his] father sold [him] while yet [his] tongue/ Could scarcely cry ‘ ‘weep! ‘weep! ‘weep! ‘weep!’; (554). These words have a double meaning. They can mean that the speaker was not yet over mourning for his mother, or they can mean that he was so young that he was not yet able to sound out the s sound properly. In this case, he would stand on the corner and, instead of repeating the word sweep in an attempt at getting someone to hire him, he would repeat the word â€Å"‘weep!’; (554). Another, more startling irony is that these young children hoped and lived for death because only in the after life could they become children. Blake emphasizes this with theShow MoreRelated William Blakes Chimney Swe eper Essay1976 Words   |  8 PagesWilliam Blakes Chimney Sweeper In this essay I am going to explore Blakes Chimney Sweeper poems from the Songs of Innocence and the Songs of Experience. During this essay I will cover Blakes life and times and the way chimney sweepers get treated around that time and what Blake attempts to do about it. Blake was born on November 28 in the year 1757. His parents where strict but understanding. Blakes parents realized early in his life that Blake was gifted. HeRead MoreAn Analysis of William Blakes The Chimney Sweeper1225 Words   |  5 PagesThesis Statement: This paper will analyze Blakes Chimney Sweeper and show how it presents an image of both experience and innocence, holding the latter up as a kind of light in the dark world of the child chimney sweepers. Outline I.Introduction A.Innocence and Experience B.The Chimney Sweeper connects both II.Recollections of a lost childhood A.Mother B.Father C.Sold into urban slavery III.Little Tom A.Hair like a Lamb B.Religious imagery C.The narrator tries to comfort him IV.RealRead More William Blakes The Chimney Sweeper Essay918 Words   |  4 PagesWilliam Blake’s The Chimney Sweeper   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚     Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  William Blake’s â€Å"The Chimney Sweeper† was mainly about the possibilities of both hope and faith. Although the poem’s connotation is that of a very dark and depressed nature, the religious imagery Blake uses indicates that the sweeps will have a brighter future in eternity.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  In lines 4 – 8 when Blake writes, â€Å"There’s little Tom Dacre, who cried when his head, That curled like a lamb’s back, was shaved: so I said ‘Hush, Tom! never mind it,Read MoreWilliam Blakes Chimney Sweeper Poems858 Words   |  4 Pages Chimney sweeper Essay Writers and artists are influenced by the culture of their time. They respond to the world around them through their work. In the 18th century, England was plagued by the gruesome repercussions of the industrial revolution. One such repercussion was the child labor of the time, where young boys at the ages of five and six were for forced to work in harsh conditions, either sweeping chimneys or working in factories. William Blake used his romantic style of writing to commentateRead MoreAn Unfolding of William Blakes quot; the Chimney Sweeperquot;691 Words   |  3 PagesAn Unfolding of William Blakes The Chimney Sweeper. William Blakes poem The Chimney Sweeper gives us a look into the unfortunate lives of 18th century London boys whose primary job was to clear chimneys of the soot that accumulated on its interior; boys that were named climbing boys or chimney sweepers. Blake, a professional engraver, wrote this poem (aabb rhyme), in the voice of a young boy, an uneducated chimney sweeper. This speaker is obviously a persona, a fictitious character createdRead MoreEssay on Innocence Stolen in William Blake’s The Chimney Sweeper843 Words   |  4 PagesThroughout world history their have been and are many occurrences of society corruption and oppression of masses, such as the forcing of small children to sweep chimneys. Thus, William Blake’s Purpose in writing the two â€Å"The Chimney Sweeper† poems was to express his outrage at society for having oppressed and stolen the innocence of powerless children in forcing them to sweep. Both poems are similar in that he uses the actions and view point of the child speaker to express his rage against societyRead More William Blakes The Chimney-Sweeper, Holy Thursday (Innocence) and London1520 Words   |  7 PagesCompare and Contrast William Blakes The Chimney-Sweeper, Holy Thursday (Innocence) and London I am going to compare and contrast three of William Blake poems, where he shows his feelings about the way people treat children: The Chimney-Sweeper, Holy Thursday (Innocence) and London. The Chimney-Sweeper is about a child who sweeps chimneys. William Blake sets this poem in the winter. The children worked in the cold. Blake says, â€Å"A little black thing among the snow,† â€Å"The little black thingRead More Childhood in Robert Frosts Birchess and William Blakes The Chimney Sweeper1301 Words   |  6 PagesFrosts Birchess and William Blakes The Chimney Sweeper Robert Frosts view of childhood is much different than that of William Blake, as expressed in their respective poems, Birches and The Chimney Sweeper. Living in the late seventeenth century, Blake saw some hard times; and as such, paints a very non-romantic picture of childhood. Frost, however, sees things differently. The result is two glaringly different poems that goes to prove how very different people are. Blakes portrayal of childhoodRead MoreIndustrialized Society in Romantic Poetry: William Blakes The Chimney Sweeper1253 Words   |  6 Pagessimultaneously. This movement as defined by one of its creators William Wordsworth was, in the preface of their collaborated work Lyrical Ballads with Samuel Coleridge, â€Å"the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquillity.(Wordsworth 1) Although the definition matched with the psychological and literary situation of the era, a couple romantic authors existed outside of the definition. William Blake was different and defined as pre-romantic author byRead MoreSolemn Soot and Social Despair In the Transformative World of William Blakes The Chimney Sweeper and London817 Words   |  3 PagesSolemn Soot and Social Despair In the Transformative World of William Blake England was changing. The rolling green shires and inspiring scenery that was fixed in the earliest memories of the Romantic poets was quickly vanishing. There was a trade off happening. Rivets for rocks, chimney stacks for trees, locomotives for carriages and steal tracks for cobblestone. Piece by piece England’s quaint agricultural backdrop was being replaced by a stern industrial one. Progress! Some shouted. The greater

Wednesday, December 18, 2019

Business Law and Repetitive Strain Injury Essay - 2638 Words

It is important for business management to develop and promote sound health and safety policies and to consider, not only the legal requirements and the possibility of prosecution, but also the possibility of an employee personal injury claim. The number of work related personal injury claims and especially those relating to Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI), an umbrella term normally used to describe Work Related Upper Limb Disorders (WRULD), seem to be rising. RSI is not a recognised medical condition, more a medical term. There are two types: type 1 RSI with recognised, specific pathological conditions and type 2 RSI non specific pain syndrome (NSPS) or Diffuse RSI, which as the name suggests is difficult to diagnosis. Some medical†¦show more content†¦Ã¢â‚¬Å"An Act for the preservation of health and morals of apprentices and others employed in cotton and other mills and other factories†. The act was the first effort to regulate factory working conditions and was important not only for the child labour improvements, but also significantly influenced further legislation and its future direction. Further legislation followed. Some of the most significant included the Factory Act 1833, empowering Crown inspectors to introduce and enforce health and safety. The Ten Hours Act of 1847, followed by the Factory and Workshop Act in 1878 dictated working hours and minimum employment age. The Factory Act 1901 covered employment and the education of children, night work, fire, and overtime pay. In1937 the Factories Act legislated the first complete system for safety, health and welfare requirements applicable to all factories and in 1961 new and existing legislation was consolidated and expanded to cover all workplaces, in the Factories Act 1961. Whereas all previous legislation was prescriptive the HASAWA etc 1974 was a significant change. 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